The Sound of Animals Fighting
We Must Become The Change We Want To See

EVR144
Released on May 1, 2007


In August of 2006, The Sound of Animals Fighting performed in their only four shows ever at The House of Blues in San Diego, Las Vegas, Hollywood, and Anaheim.

Lucklily, a camera crew was at the Anaheim show to capture this once in a lifetime show on film.

We Must Become The Change We Want To See is a live DVD of the entire live performance, plus bonus footage unavailable anywhere else. The DVD is a Hot Topic and MerchNow exclusive, so you won't find it in any other stores.

PastePunk.com - Album Review
July 18, 2007

In describing THE SOUND OF ANIMALS FIGHTING's Lover, The Lord Has Left Us, Pastepunk's Mark Jourdian said the following: "simply put, the songs arenít as strong as the performance." While I'm guessing the mysterious supergroup's decision to play a select number of shows last year was not due to Mark's conclusion, he couldn't have been more right. Because THE SOUND OF ANIMALS FIGHTING is essentially a project that comes to life when its bazillion members feel like getting together, the mere fact that they were able to play one show - let alone four - is why a DVD documenting the event is worthwhile in a market where band DVDs are often worthless.

Despite the fact that the bulk of the ANIMALS' performance here consists of songs from the ultra-uneven Lover, We Must Become The Change We Want To See is largely entertaining. Pretty much every member of RX BANDITS holds down the instrumentation for the set's entirety. Like their albums, the group never rests as they opt to include atmospheric and electronic passages in-between songs. Aside from the moments where CIRCA SURVIVE's Anthony Green and DAYS AWAY's Keith Goodwin share vocal duties, the most exciting moments come during songs from the band's first disc, Tiger & The Duke. Arguably the best four songs the group has ever written, songs like "Act II: All Is Ash Or The Light Shining Through It" and "Act III: Modulate Back To The Tonic" are absolute show stoppers. "Act I: Chasing Suns," in all it's magnificent riffing glory, sees Green on stage for the first time, screaming and shouting like he did the last time he was playing with a bunch of messy-haired Californians. The performance comes equipped with the occasional appearance of stage dancers, masked-and-cloaked creatures, and, as is consistent with the band's artistic "vibe," men painting on either side of the stage.

The recording quality of the DVD is top-notch, as is the sound. While its replayability may be at a minimum, it is certainly a pleasure to witness the gathering of several of this little scene's figureheads. And, for once, the mystery of the band's members is finally forgotten as the guys simply come out, play some killer songs, and have a rocking and enjoyable evening.


Corey Schmidt

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