Circa Survive
On Letting Go

EVR139
Released on May 29, 2007

1. Living Together
2. In The Morning and Amazing...
3. The Greatest Lie
Get MP34. The Difference Between Medicine and Poison is in the Dose
5. Mandala
6. Travel Hymn
7. Semi Constructive Criticism
8. Kicking Your Crosses Down
9. On Letting Go
10. Carry Us Away
11. Close Your Eyes To See
12. Your Friends Are Gone

In early 2007, Circa Survive recorded their magical new album, On Letting Go with producer Brian McTernan (Thrice, Strike Anywhere, Hot Water Music) at his Salad Days Studios in Baltimore, MD. The beautiful new recording presents Circa Survive in a brand new light. It shows a band that has become more comfortable with themselves, a band that has developed naturally, and a band with endless confidence... it shows a band that has truly let go.

Vinyl Information

  • 12" Picture Disc Vinyl (Limited to 1,000 copies / Dec. 2008)
Transform Online - Album Review
July 18, 2007

Equal Vision seems to love them some high-pitched frontmen. Youinseries, Coheed And Cambria, and Circa Survive all have singers whose vocal abilities climb into the upper echelons of the male range. But where Coheed And Cambria have a strange kind of cartoonish quality to their vocals, Circa Survive have an epic beauty rarely captured in rock. Similar in tone to William Hut of Poor Rich Ones, Anthony Green croons his belts. And rather than outright reaching and stretching for those precipitous heights like so many screamo dudes, Green seems to easily land every pitch. There’s also a lack of that “vocal glory” that worries us all sometimes. “Glory” being the cheesy use of the term, such as Steve Perry of Journey. Although I do love me some Journey, it is quite cheesy. Green does emphatically project a few screams here and there at key moments, especially in the ending of “The Difference Between Medicine and Poison is the Dose,” where he finishes with the line “did you ever wish you were somebody else!” His screams are poignantly chosen, however, and not excessive.

Instrumentally, On Letting Go is a push for power. Epic and punchy, the drums are the thumping, chugging steam engine of each track. The elegant, reverbed beauty of the guitars seals the whole story together in a grand statement. A statement made as firmly with overdriven rhythm guitars as it is with clean lead ones. Engine Down would be proud, I think. The word “majesty” sums up this kind of rock. If I had to coin a new genre, I’d use the word majestic and then come up with some other clever catchy sounding term to encapsulate it (like when people say “prog-core” or “death-alt-metal”… or even “screamo”). I mean this as a compliment entirely. Circa Survive have a majesty that begs you to listen and caresses your ears while you do. It’s shout-to-the-rafters fury with the grandeur of a symphony. On Letting Go is a call to arms for the kids with bigger urges than just their first lovemaking experience or video games. It’s carrying more than just a teenage love affair in its surprisingly mature shell.


Peter A. Holden

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